450 Tennis Drills & Games

If you are a new or seasoned tennis coach here is access to more than 400 tennis drills and games, you will be able to add more variety and fun to your tennis lessons and classes.

For the new coach who may have taken over a JV or Varsity tennis team you will enjoy over 450 Quality Tennis Drills For 2-4 Players, Large Groups, Footwork And Fitness Drills, Tennis Lesson Plans And Many More.   We know how difficult it is to come up with your own drills and lesson plans.   Here, the guesswork is taken out of scratching your head and losing sleep over what drills to do with your players.   This is well worth the investment if you are serious about your tennis.

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Quick Start Tennis

If you have a child under the age of 12 and you would like them to learn how to play the game of tennis, you might want to consider the new Quick Start Tennis program at your local tennis club. Quick Start tennis was derived by the USTA (United States Tennis Assn.) specifically with young children in mind. These children are taught to play tennis on a smaller tennis court with age height appropriate nets and larger foam tennis balls.

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Tennis Shots: The Backhand

From listening to tennis commentators, it would be easy to come to the conclusion that a backhand was something that any tennis player compares to a particularly troubling visit to the dentist – if it can be avoided, you should, because the result of going there will be painful and potentially embarrassing.

There is no doubt that a good backhand is trickier to play, and therefore rarer in the competitive game, than a forehand. For this reason, professional players will aim to hit to their opponent’s backhand in the hope of forcing a mistake. Because it is an “unnatural” shot – played across rather than with the player’s body, mistakes are more common with it – but a good backhand is worth developing, because it can be devastating.

As players instinctively aim for their opponents’ backhands, having a good shot with that stroke is liable to win you a lot of points. The Swiss Stanislas Wawrinka, a top twenty player with a moderate record in the game, is believed by no less an authority than John McEnroe to have the best backhand he has ever seen – but unfortunately for Wawrinka, this has resulted in players hitting to his less gifted forehand.

Wawrinka’s compatriot Roger Federer is one of very few top players to hit the backhand single-handed, allowing him greater reach and ability to hit on the run. This has made him dangerous from anywhere on the court, a major element in his success in the game.

Tennis Shots: The Forehand

The forehand is considered the easiest tennis shot to master, perhaps because it is the most natural one to hit. It involves holding the racket out from the body and striking forward, with your palm facing towards your opponent at the point of contact. The fact that it is considered to be easy to master does not make it a less dangerous shot – some of the best individual shots in the game are forehands, with the modern game featuring some particularly dangerous forehands including those of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.

A well-judged forehand is particularly hard to counter because of the level of power and accuracy that can be contained in it. Most players will try to get opponents to hit to their forehand because it gives them a better chance of hitting a winner, and players are known to run further in order to “run around” their backhand, purely because they know that the forehand shot has a better chance of landing in court and potentially being a winning shot.

Great exponents of the forehand include the aforementioned Federer and Nadal, whose running forehand cross-court shot is considered unplayable on a good day. As well as these two, players like Ilie Nastase and Fred Perry were particularly good at hitting the forehand while among the female players Steffi Graf is considered to have been the best female player of the shot, earning her the nickname “Fraulein Forehand” as a result. The fastest forehand ever recorded was by the Frenchman Gael Monfils in 2007 at the Australian Open, measured at 118mph.     Learn how…

Tennis Shots: The Volley

If you want to make a real success of your grass court game, you are going to have to come to the net at times or risk being beaten by someone with greater killer instinct. The approach to the net is all important in grass court tennis – and to a lesser extent on other services – because if you can hit a good volley, you will win a lot of free points if you get to the net.

A volley is any shot that is played before the ball bounces on your side of the net. Serve-volley tennis, a major component in most successful grass court games, entails hitting your serve and then approaching the net to volley away any return. It is particularly deadly on grass because any well-judged volley will bounce so low as to be impossible for the opponent to reach.

Many people feel that a volley is only as good as the player’s approach to the net to make it. If you can volley well, but come to the net at the wrong time – because for example your opponent hits returns well and has the measure of your serve – then you will be passed by your opponent. If on the other hand you judge the approach right, you will have easier volley opportunities.

Among the best volleyers in the history of the men’s game, John McEnroe was considered to have the best pure volley while Sweden’s Stefan Edberg was believed to have the best combination of approach and volley.   Read more…

Introducing Your Child to Tennis

“This book is THE perfect introduction and primer for parents whose kids like tennis and want to learn how to play the game correctly.”—Tennis Magazine—United States Tennis Association

“This is a comprehensive, easy-to-follow guide for getting your child started playing the game.”—Bill Colson, Senior Editor Sports Illustrated  

In this lively guide, Pierce Kelley shows you how to successfully introduce your child to the game of tennis. This book offers you:    

  • Technique-building drills and exercises
  • Step-by-step instructions on how to practice with your child
  • Illustrations that show you correct stances and strokes
  • A glossary of tennis terms, to help you speak the language
  • When and how to choose a tennis pro, and more